Tag Archives: accountability

Create a Culture of Trust:
The Power of Accountability

It may seem near impossible to create a culture of trust when organizational morale and engagement are lowered by people who can’t be counted on. They flame resentments and dissatisfaction throughout the organization. But can holding people personally accountable promote positivity, unity and build trust? There is a paradoxical truth in the power of accountability.
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Leadership 2018:
Allegiance to Purpose

I’ve been writing about leadership values and business ethics in recent posts. It’s clear to me that successful leadership in 2018 will require better business principles and allegiance to purpose. Let’s look at business ethics and principles from a different angle. In my opinion, it’s hard to come up with really good innovative ideas and products when people are driven […]
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Better Business Principles for 2018

We’re quickly approaching another new year; where will you prioritize your energies to shape your business in 2018? How will you apply your business principles? If you’re like most leaders, you take a bit of time to review, reflect and renew during this holiday season. If you haven’t read it yet, I recommend Gary Hamel’s book, What Matters Now: […]
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Leading Wisely with Your Values

Are you leading wisely with your values? Successful leaders who follow their values are seen as authentic, and are appreciated because they’re genuine and trustworthy. I know, because I see it in the executives and leaders I work with. They set a vision based on value-oriented choices and hone in on a path for the […]
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How Values Impact Your Leadership Success

The problem with reminding people about core values, and how they impact your leadership success, is that it often comes across as preaching or judgmental. But given the trend in headlines, the question remains: How could so many smart people get it wrong?
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Your Values Determine How You Lead

Leadership starts in the mind and with your most worthy intentions and core values. Your values—your personal principles— direct your thoughts, priorities, preferences, and actions. The aspects of life that you value shape your character, which determines how you do everything. Your values determine how you lead. Unfortunately, many leaders haven’t identified their values and often […]
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Friends at Work:
Three Types of Friendships

Many of us have friends at work, while others, including leaders and C-level executives, seem to struggle making friends in a workplace environment.  Why is that?
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Great Leaders Make Friends at Work

Great leaders who have friends at work certainly seem to have more fun on the job. But did you know that leaders with workplace friendships make better decisions, are more engaged in work, more committed, and productive?
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Symptoms of “Good-Enough” Leaders

It might be shocking to think, but you might be seeing symptoms of “good-enough” leaders in your organization.  I’ve been exploring how organizations suffer from a culture of “good-enough.”  What I’ve found in my coaching practice is that leaders in these organizations are not focused on excellence. They send signals that they don’t care―­some signs are subtle, […]
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Here’s How a Good-Enough Culture Takes Root

In my previous post on a “good-enough” culture, I explored the many ways mediocrity wastes billions of dollars in organizations. Like most organizational culture, it flows down from the top of the organization. It takes root when leaders believe that a “good-enough” approach is acceptable.
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