An Organization Built on Strengths:
Creating Multi-discipline Teams

Multi-discipline-TeamsHave you noticed how people are often paired together because they are similar, rather than because of their diverse strengths? It really doesn’t make sense to me, when teams composed of individuals who vary in their strengths, skills and personalities, feed synergy and motivation. I have seen leaders achieve tremendous results by creating well–rounded, multi-discipline teams to make the most of their personal strengths.

When paired with other skill-sets, people inspire one another and learn from each other. The sense of unity reduces barriers and creates a collective drive to solve problems with creative solutions. Leaders are better able to forge a focus on goals rather than specific work assignments, leading to a higher rate of productivity.

With teams, empowerment is more viable, where authority is pushed down to the lowest level possible. People develop a greater spirit of self-sufficiency and decision making, providing higher levels of ownership, pride and interest in their work. They share their strengths and develop new ones from their teammates. They use their strengths to embrace challenges and have a more positive outlook when they’re given these freedoms.

Don’t forget the impact of proximity and workspace. A combination of private and common spaces, with appropriate noise abatement and elbow room, yields maximum engagement. Team members are naturally led to combine strengths with the different disciplines and backgrounds of their teammates, letting them get to know, trust, and influence each other. The power of interaction can compensate for a lacking in certain strengths.

Team Challenge

Leaders who select projects for the strengths of their people have a far greater success rate than those who simply dole out work without strength considerations. Intentionally crafting projects that specifically challenge the strengths of a person or team are also more successful. People are more inspired and inventive when forced to use their strengths, especially when they are pushed to their limits.

Projects come is varying degrees of complexity and difficulty. Leaders who want to maximize their peoples’ strengths will assign projects toward the lowest level of capability that can pull off results. This creates a challenge that causes people to lift their game, grow and find fulfillment in ways they never thought they could.

What do you think? Have you created multi-disciplined teams that are strengths-based? What have you noticed about your most effective teams? I’d love to hear from you.  Give me a call, 704-827-4474. Or, you can reach me here and on LinkedIn.

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