Countering Egotistic Leadership:
Taking Ground Back

Defeating-EgotismEgotistic leadership can be countered. But it takes a deliberate effort on the part of leaders to refocus and see things from a wider view. Trained coaches are an excellent resource to guide leaders to a helpful perspective. In some cases, a leader can only make progress on becoming less egotistical through working with an experienced professional.

An effective leader requires a life of balance. Some ego tendencies are beneficial. Boldness and confidence are certainly assets in forging direction and inspiring followers. But these tendencies must be kept in check and proportioned with other important leadership attributes.

Author Ryan Holiday, in his book, Ego Is the Enemy (Penguin, 2016) suggests that to minimize the unhealthy effects of ego, leaders find a conscious balance between:

  • Strengths and weaknesses
  • Ambition and caution
  • Confidence and doubt
  • Foresight and hindsight
  • Boldness and accountability
  • Inspiration and being grounded
  • Personal needs and the needs of others

A leader needs to optimize the art of self-management, in order to suppress and channel ego when needed. This takes an awareness of the danger signs. It takes an accurate self-assessment, where leaders can see themselves from a distance. Detaching from false assumptions and their influences is key, as is recognizing and resisting the temptations. It always feels good to satisfy the inner cravings of self-importance, but danger is never far away.

An important aspect of correcting egotistical tendencies is learning about emotional intelligence, and working with an executive coach is advised. Improving EQ requires a leader to properly substitute humility for ego. This is a vital skill in subduing the effects of ego. It is a difficult transition for a leader to make, but with support and coaching, it can be done.

A key practice is to recognize the viewpoints of others. No one can see themselves objectively enough to override all their blind spots. Asking for feedback and getting help is an important weapon a leader can use to defeat egotistical tendencies.

What’s it like where you work? Have you ever worked for someone with too much ego? I’d love to hear from you. I can be reached at 704-827-4474. Or, you can reach me here and on LinkedIn.

This entry was posted in career, coaching, communication, leadership and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Post a comment or leave a trackback: Trackback URL.

Post a Comment

Your email is never published nor shared. Required fields are marked *

*
*

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>