The Compulsive Leader’s Blind Spots

Compulsive-Leader-Blind-SpotWhen you learn to recognize the signs of a compulsive leader, you won’t have to look far to see it in much of today’s corporate culture. With a high value on accomplishment and productivity, there are many compulsive, driven leaders in executive positions. I know, because I see it all the time in the work I do coaching leaders and executives. Ultimately, these leaders need to address their blind spots. Read More »

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The Compulsive Leader Mindset

Self-ManagementThere are unique challenges when working for a leader with a compulsive mindset. I’ve been doing some reading and writing about this in my recent posts. Understanding the compulsive leader mindset—their perspectives and motivations—can go a long way toward healthier behavior. Read More »

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The Signs of a Compulsive Leader

Bad ManagementDo you recognize the signs of a compulsive leader? Some are subtle and need to be observed over time. Others are obvious when first experienced. Either way, certain outward behaviors signal to people they’re working for a compulsive leader.

I wrote about this in my last post, here. Compulsive leaders demonstrate high energy and dedication to long hours without complaint. Their emphasis on results is reflected in their speech and decisions. They are bottom-line people, often cutting off others to get to the main point. They take the direct and ultra-efficient approach. They refer to their accomplishments as a matter of habit and continuously cite their goals. Read More »

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The Challenges Posed by Compulsive Leaders

MicromanagingIs it fair to say there are many driven, compulsive leaders in executive position in your organization? I see it all the time: because most corporate cultures place such a high value on accomplishment and productivity, it’s no surprise that leaders who, while bent on achieving success, present difficulties for the people who work for them.

While compulsive leaders can claim credit for myriad workplace advancements, their obsession with tasks and goals contributes to employee dissatisfaction and disengagement. If you report to a compulsive leader, you likely experience mixed feelings over completing great work vs. bearing the pain that comes with it. Read More »

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The One-on-One Meeting:
Mastering Your Technique

One-on-One-Meeting-Conversations-MatterGreat leaders have great people skills; they know that how a one-on-one meeting is conducted is just as important as the topics discussed. Perhaps the most important element is clear communication.

I wrote about this in my last post. This is a major point John Maxwell expresses consistently in his many books, in particular, The 21 Indispensable Qualities of a Leader (Thomas Nelson, 1999).  To communicate clearly, verify with your employee that you are understood.

Guide the conversation, but don’t rule it. I have found that intent listening and acknowledgement are two of the most important communication tools. Pause to respond, doing it calmly, yet confidently. All of these show respect and consideration. Read More »

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The One-on-One Meeting:
Policy and Preparation

Open-Door-PolicyAs a leader, is the one-on-one meeting a regular part of your administrative policy? How is it perceived?

If one-on-one meetings are not a significant part of your leadership portfolio, they should be (read my previous post, here.) As a welcome component of your leadership process, one-on-one meetings are not a sign of trouble or concern, rather, they signal that you are an engaged leader.

Communication is key. Be clear that everyone gets to have a one-on-one with you. No one is placed in a dubious category by meeting with the leader privately. Making the meetings a positive aspect of your team process eliminates the fear or awkwardness when calling them. Read More »

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The One-on-One Meeting:
Go From Trepidation to Appreciation

One-to-One MeetingsMany leaders dread or avoid private, one-on-one meetings because they are viewed as uncontrollable, unpredictable, or risky. They seem to require an almost perfect use of soft skills and techniques, and swing with as much variation as the personalities with whom you’re meeting. Read More »

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World’s Best Boss:
Manager AND Leader

Worlds-Best-Boss-Leader-AND-ManagerDo you have the best blend of manager and leader skills to be called the “World’s Best Boss?”

Administrators who cling to a sole management or leadership approach handicap their organizations, and are not likely to be nominated the best boss of anything. Read More »

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Management and Leadership:
The Best Blend

Management-Leadership-BlendAs a business administrator, do you have the best blend of management and leadership skills?

After reviewing the distinctions between managers and leaders, should we assume that one administrative model is superior to the other? Should you adopt a purely managerial or leadership model? Read More »

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Management vs. Leadership:
Your Authority and Behavior

Management-vs- Leadership-Authority-BehaviorAs a business administrator, authority is one of the clearest distinctions between managers and leaders.

I’ve been writing about this in my recent posts because the definitions of managers and leaders are far from straightforward, and they’re the subject of much debate. Any complex comparison reveals a definite overlap between managers and leaders.

But the distinction is important because employees’ impressions of their administrators can spark or sink both parties’ careers.  And how you oversee, direct and assess completion of staff activities radically affects your direct reports. Read More »

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